Daily Post:  Pursue – Is Pursuing a Goal/Score/Numbers Worth the Cost?

Heading a soccer ball is a dangerous thing to do, but I imagine young high schoolers think it looks cool to show their skill that way. As an observer, I prefer watching the fancy footwork. But what do I know, I’m just a protective grandma.

My grandson headed a ball on Saturday morning in his own game, had a headache, but went through the rest of the day refereeing three games. Sunday morning he collapsed, had convulsions, and was taken to the ER. Cat scan was done but they said he needed an MRI. No driving, electronics, or school was advised. Friday night he will have the MRI, and still has a headache and some vision problems. I will write results on the weekend, but keep your fingers crossed he is okay.

Apparently this is not an uncommon occurrence, but rarely spoken about in the media. I watched the movie “Concussion” which told the story of the injuries during football. I think some of these actions by players should stop. What is the reason for putting young people in danger for a goal or score? My thoughts are simple: None! There is no justification.

Pursuing a number on a scoreboard should not put a child in danger.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/pursue/.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Daily Post:  Pursue – Is Pursuing a Goal/Score/Numbers Worth the Cost?

  1. Pingback: Author Interview – Katie Salidas – “The Immortalis”, “Olde Town Pack”, “Little Werewolf” & RONE Award Winning “Chronicles of the Uprising” (Fantasy, Paranormal, Romance & Horror) | tooful

  2. Is there a particular reason an MRI hasn’t already been done, Cheryl? It seems like a week is a long time to wait. Holding you in Love and Light! 😉 xoxoM

    Like

  3. I am sorry about your grandson. I was wondering if he was a child, but then I saw that he was refereeing games. Heading a soccer ball is quite a common maneuver in the beautiful game. In fact, as an ardent soccer fan I can’t imagine the game being played without heading. That being said, there is a technique involved that players are taught from an early age. For starters, players should meet the ball with their forehead and not the top of their heads.

    I am sure your grandson will be fine. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.